Preparation Of The Isolation Room Or Area

- Mar 27, 2020-

  • Ensure that appropriate handwashing facilities and hand-hygiene supplies are available.

  • Stock the sink area with suitable supplies for handwashing, near the point of care and the room door.

  • Ensure adequate room ventilation.

  • Post signs on the door indicating that space is an isolation area.

  • Ensure that visitors consult in charge (who is also responsible for keeping a visitor record) before being allowed into the isolation areas. Keep a roster of all staff working in the isolation areas, for possible outbreak investigation and contact tracing.

  • Remove all non-essential furniture and ensure that the remaining furniture is easy to clean, and does not conceal or retain dirt or moisture within or around it.

  • Stock the PPE supply and linen outside the isolation room or area (e.g. in the change room). Setup a trolley outside the door to hold PPE. A checklist may be useful to ensure that all equipment is available

  • Place appropriate waste bags in a bin. If possible, use a touch-free bin. Ensure that used (i.e. dirty) bins remain inside the isolation rooms.

  • Place a puncture-proof container for sharps disposal inside the isolation room or area.

  • Keep the patient's personal belongings to a minimum. Keep water pitchers and cups, tissue wipes, and all items necessary for attending to personal hygiene, within the patient's reach.

  • Dedicate non-critical patient-care equipment (e.g. stethoscope, thermometer, blood pressure cuff, and sphygmomanometer) to the patient, if possible. Thoroughly clean and disinfect patient-care equipment that is required for use by other patients before use.

  • Place an appropriate container with a lid outside the door for equipment that requires sterilization.

  • Keep adequate equipment required for cleaning inside the isolation room or area, and ensure scrupulous daily cleaning of the isolation room or area.

  • Set up a telephone or other method of communication in the isolation room or area to enable patients, family members or visitors to communicate with health-care workers. This may reduce the number of times the workers need to don PPE to enter the room or area.